Chapter

1802–1835

Estill Curtis Pennington

in Lessons in Likeness

Published by University Press of Kentucky

Published in print October 2010 | ISBN: 9780813126128
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780813135458 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813126128.003.0001
1802–1835

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Social and Cultural History

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter starts by presenting the reports of early artists and itinerant activity. John James Audubon observed wildlife and painted portraits in Kentucky. He was a naturalist artist and first arrived in Kentucky in August 1807 with his business partner and fellow Frenchman, Ferdinand Rozier. Matthew Harris Jouett embarked upon a career after instruction from Gilbert Stuart. He became the most legendary portraitist in the history of Kentucky. The Steamboat travel launched Kentucky–Mississippi itinerancy. In addition, Chester Harding painted in Paris, Kentucky, and pursued Daniel Boone. The large number of extant unsigned and undocumented portraits in the Ohio River Valley poses an enormous challenge to potential detectives of its art history. One case study involves the portraits of Captain and Mrs. Benjamin Bayless and the careers of Aaron Houghton Corwine and Alonzo Douglass. John Wesley Jarvis visited Louisville and headed south to New Orleans. “Kentucky” West painted Lord Byron and was himself acclaimed a romantic hero. Cincinnati emerged as an urban center and attracted resident portrait artists. Though Thomas Sully never visited Kentucky, his portraiture was well known in the commonwealth. He also attracted students and sitters from Kentucky.

Keywords: John James Audubon; Matthew Harris Jouett; Chester Harding; Daniel Boone; Aaron Houghton Corwine; Alonzo Douglass; John Wesley Jarvis; Thomas Sully; Kentucky; Ohio River Valley

Chapter.  16468 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at University Press of Kentucky »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.