Chapter

Personalizing Tradition: On Storytelling by an African American Father and Son

Simon J. Bronner

in Explaining Traditions

Published by University Press of Kentucky

Published in print January 2012 | ISBN: 9780813134062
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780813135885 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5810/kentucky/9780813134062.003.0008
Personalizing Tradition: On Storytelling by an African American Father and Son

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Eugene Powell, a storyteller with a large repertoire of jokes and legends is documented in his Greenville, Mississippi, home. Although Eugene's son Ernest learned many narratives from his father, he adapted them to his own more aggressive personality and the contexts of jails and bars. The tension and competition takes on significance because of the importance of this storytelling tradition within the African American male community where the man of words is accorded honor.

Keywords: African Americans; Mississippi; masculinity; legends; jokes; toasts

Chapter.  15013 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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