Chapter

Human Rights: Have the Public Benefited?

Lord Woolf

in Proceedings of the British Academy, Volume 121, 2002 Lectures

Published by British Academy

Published in print December 2003 | ISBN: 9780197263037
Published online February 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191734007 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5871/bacad/9780197263037.003.0012

Series: Proceedings of the British Academy

Human Rights: Have the Public Benefited?

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This lecture discusses the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR), which was established due to the atrocities committed by the Nazis during the Second World War. It looks at the scale of the changes that occurred in constitutional arrangements, and considers the fact that these changes have been achieved without damaging the underlying constitutional arrangements and traditions of the United Kingdom. The lecture also considers whether these changes would benefit the public, and studies some of the arguments that are both in favour of and against the ECHR in becoming a part of the country's law.

Keywords: European Convention of Human Rights; changes; constitutional arrangements; traditions; arguments; benefits to the public

Chapter.  6074 words. 

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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