Chapter

Are there Universal Principles or Forms of Evidential Inference? Of Inference Networks and Onto-Epistemology

PETER TILLERS

in Evidence, Inference and Enquiry

Published by British Academy

Published in print December 2011 | ISBN: 9780197264843
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191754050 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5871/bacad/9780197264843.003.0009

Series: Proceedings of the British Academy

Are there Universal Principles or Forms of Evidential Inference? Of Inference Networks and Onto-Epistemology

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This chapter discusses the limitations of approaches to modelling and handling evidential issues using hierarchical network representations. Such models of evidential inference rest on the compound proposition that real-world evidential inference usually or always consists of propositional ‘atoms’ (i.e. relatively granular propositional statements about states of the world) that are linked together by nomological entities of some kind, entities that are often — but not always — called ‘generalisations’. These sorts of models or representations of evidential inference are referred to as ‘network-and-generalisation’ models of evidential inference. It is argued that for certain important problems, especially where these concern meaning and human understanding, these need to be complemented by other methods.

Keywords: evidence; hierarchical network representations; evidential inference; generalisations; network-and-generalisation models

Chapter.  8569 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Social Research and Statistics

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