Chapter

Leisure Culture and the Commercialization of Black Women's Sex Work, 1900–1920

in I've Got to Make My Livin'

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print December 2010 | ISBN: 9780226055985
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226056005 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226056005.003.0006
Leisure Culture and the Commercialization of Black Women's Sex Work, 1900–1920

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter examines the geographical and institutional transformation of African American women's work in the sex economy of Chicago in the early 1900s. It explains that this transformation was brought about by the rise of African American male leisure entrepreneurs and the expansion of the urban leisure economy within Chicago's Black Belt. The shift in the sex economy forced African American prostitutes to work as employees in male-owned saloons and nightclubs, while others operated small brothels and engaged in independent prostitution well into the 1920s.

Keywords: sex economy; geographical transformation; institutional transformation; American African prostitutes; independent prostitution; urban leisure economy

Chapter.  14796 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of the Americas

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.