Chapter

Who Benefits from Shared Capitalism? The Social Stratification of Wealth and Power in Companies with Employee Ownership

Edward J. Carberry

in Shared Capitalism at Work

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print May 2010 | ISBN: 9780226056951
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226056968 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226056968.003.0011
Who Benefits from Shared Capitalism? The Social Stratification of Wealth and Power in Companies with Employee Ownership

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This chapter examines how access to shared capitalism, returns from shared capitalism programs, and organizational power and authority within companies with shared capitalism are stratified by gender, race, ethnicity, and disability. The value of assets acquired through shared capitalism is usually directly related to pay; it is not possible to assume that implementing shared capitalism creates instant equity and fairness. The reality is that the implementation and operation of these plans occurs within broader structures of stratification, and this reality may have negative consequences for the effectiveness of these plans if employees perceive their implementation and operation as unfair. Beyond the traditional mechanisms of stratification, the ways in which certain types of shared capitalism are designed and operated can create further disparities in access and financial value for different groups.

Keywords: shared capitalism; employee ownership; social stratification; ethnicity; profit sharing; gender; race; disability

Chapter.  12503 words. 

Subjects: Economic History

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