Chapter

Introduction

in How Philosophers Saved Myths

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print December 2004 | ISBN: 9780226075358
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226075389 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226075389.003.0001
Introduction

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This book describes the protection of myth saved by allegory, which was not eliminated by historians, philosophers, and theologians, but which made it possible to associate the most scandalous of narratives and bizarre details to deep truths. During the period when writing made its appearance, myth came into the picture only when it underwent a drastic assessment by the first historians and especially the first philosophers. Plato rejected allegory, though he did not abandon myth, but it was practiced by Aristotle with self-discipline and caution. Allegory enabled the constant adaptation and interpretation of myths to fit the context in which they were received. Thus, allegory made it possible for myths to survive.

Keywords: myth; allegory; historians; philosophers; narratives

Chapter.  1037 words. 

Subjects: Classical Philosophy

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