Chapter

Beyond Pioneering: Social Homesteaders as Uneasy Gentrifiers

Japonica Brown-Saracino

in A Neighborhood That Never Changes

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780226076621
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226076645 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226076645.003.0003
Beyond Pioneering: Social Homesteaders as Uneasy Gentrifiers

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This chapter begins by introducing two pioneers as background and contrast to the social homesteaders who are its focus. The first is Fred, a white gay man in his fifties who owns several prominent Provincetown businesses that serve gays and lesbians. Fred, who is athletic and classically handsome, moved to town in the 1980s with his partner and certainly fits the pioneer prototype. Like other pioneers, he was drawn to Provincetown by the excitement and sense of promise he associated with gentrification. Fred sold his law practice outside Boston so he “could start a whole new life, a new business. That was exciting.” He was also drawn to Provincetown because of qualities he associates with newcomers.

Keywords: social homesteaders; Provincetown businesses; gays and lesbians; gentrification; pioneers; newcomers

Chapter.  13026 words. 

Subjects: Urban and Rural Studies

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