Chapter

Conclusion

in Richard Rorty

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print May 2008 | ISBN: 9780226309903
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226309910 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226309910.003.0012
Conclusion

Show Summary Details

Preview

From the earliest days of the pragmatist revival, Richard Rorty occupied an ambiguous position in the community of scholars interested in pragmatism. The fame he won for himself with Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature and Consequences of Pragmatism he gave back to pragmatism a hundredfold—to John Dewey in particular—always insisting that his own philosophy was merely a restatement in more contemporary philosophical terms of Dewey's own. On the other hand, many scholars of pragmatism claimed he was giving the tradition a bad name. They charged him with misrepresenting its core ideas and associating it with a kind of loose relativism much at odds with the seriousness with which the classical pragmatists regarded the enterprise of inquiry.

Keywords: Richard Rorty; pragmatism; John Dewey; philosophy; relativism; inquiry

Chapter.  7760 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.