Chapter

Courting Contempt

in Justice in the Balkans

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print November 2003 | ISBN: 9780226312286
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226312309 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226312309.003.0009
Courting Contempt

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Human Rights and Immigration

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Geoffrey Nice explains some of the difficulties involved in penetrating Milosevic's inner circle and especially in finding a smoking-gun witness. He explained that Milosevic held a subtle but intimidating power to implicate, and therefore intimidate, insiders with his own inside knowledge. As in the Srebrenica trial, the court reserved judgment on the admissibility of the intercepts and then listened to them as part of its decision-making process. The EU was clearly trying to find a way to minimize American objections and obstacles to the initiation of the ICC's work. Bolton responded by urging the British and the French governments to agree bilaterally to broader exemption clauses that further protect civilian leaders such as Kissinger. The growth and success of the ICT occurred because of transgovernmental links with U.S. agencies, and with many other nations' agencies and nongovernmental organizations.

Keywords: Geoffrey Nice; Milosevic; Srebrenica trial; decision-making process; transgovernmental links

Chapter.  17683 words. 

Subjects: Human Rights and Immigration

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.