Chapter

Terra Incognita: Jane Addams, Philanthropic Slumming, and the Elusive Identity of Hull-house

Scott Herring

in Queering the Underworld

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print December 2007 | ISBN: 9780226327907
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226327921 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226327921.003.0002
Terra Incognita: Jane Addams, Philanthropic Slumming, and the Elusive Identity of Hull-house

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Michel Foucault's claim that Western formations of homosexuality historically originated from within the middle classes should have given scholars in U.S. queer studies pause, if only because the field has yet to exhaust the interclass dynamics of this most recent technology of normalization and modernity. Following Foucault's lead, this chapter asks what “class effects” emerged from the “shifts and transpositions” of urban interclass contact prior to these formative years, and addresses the question of the philanthropic Progressive slummer. One of the more influential U.S. social movements of the late nineteenth century, Progressivism emerged as a middle-class response to the perceived mysteries and miseries of the metropolis: immigrant migrations from locales other than Northern Europe; rampant industrialization; and the development of cosmopolitan neighborhoods removed from the watchful eye of developing suburbs.

Keywords: Michel Foucault; homosexuality; queer studies; middle classes; Progressivism; immigrant migrations; industrialization; metropolis

Chapter.  15118 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies

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