Chapter

National Styles in Science: A Possible Factor in the Scientific Revolution?

John Henry

in Geography and Revolution

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print December 2005 | ISBN: 9780226487335
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226487359 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226487359.003.0003
National Styles in Science: A Possible Factor in the Scientific Revolution?

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This chapter tries to bring out differences in national styles during the early modern period by looking at some characteristic differences between English and Continental, particularly French, science in the seventeenth century. It aims to suggest that differences in national styles may be another factor worth exploring and to stimulate others to explore it further. Differences in national styles seem to be particularly evident in the seventeenth century, the period when a new way of doing science was being developed in western Europe. As the traditional Scholasticism of the premodern period was being rejected and replaced by a “new philosophy,” different national styles of thinking gave rise to markedly different conceptions of the correct way to approach an understanding of the natural world.

Keywords: scientific revolution; modern period; national styles; western Europe; Scholasticism; premodern period

Chapter.  14512 words. 

Subjects: History of Science and Technology

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