Chapter

Domestic Education at the Girls Boarding School

in Worries of the Heart

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print September 2007 | ISBN: 9780226554198
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226554228 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226554228.003.0012
Domestic Education at the Girls Boarding School

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This chapter looks in detail at domestic education at the Girls Boarding School (GBS). Widows and other parents in Maragoli actively sought to educate their daughters, primarily because they had seen girls educated in the 1930s garner higher bridewealth for their mothers. They turned to the GBS. The missionaries reasoned that the exclusivity of the boarding school, like that of Christian villages, protected the girls from becoming tainted with “heathen” practices. The girls who did not make it to the GBS often settled for an elementary education in domesticity. In the 1940s and 1950s“homecraft” education became pervasive in the rural areas. The education of girls had clearly become crucial in the “civilizing” process. A respectable Maragoli man wanted to marry a Maragoli trophy wife like those produced at the GBS.

Keywords: domestic education; Girls Boarding School; Maragoli; bridewealth; Christian villages; domesticity; homecraft

Chapter.  4375 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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