Chapter

Tending the Soul

Julie A. Nelson

in Economics for Humans

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print October 2006 | ISBN: 9780226572024
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226572055 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226572055.003.0003
Tending the Soul

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This chapter outlines the history of “critical” views in sociology and philosophy that developed in the early twentieth century. This history reveals that the view of market critics is based on the same eighteenth-century Smithian metaphor as the probusiness view. The critics of markets, corporations, or capitalism defend what they see as important dimensions of human life against what they call “economic” or “market” values. The market-critic prescriptions all agree that the capitalist economy is a machine. Advocates of a “separate spheres” prescription can find intellectual ammunition for their position in the work of this influential thinker. It is believed that the prescribed solutions lack when held up to criteria of realism and effectiveness. Sometimes these solutions could cause real damage.

Keywords: sociology; philosophy; market critics; market-critic prescriptions; capitalist economy; separate spheres

Chapter.  3856 words. 

Subjects: Economics

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