Chapter

Historical Fragmentation Shaping Vertebrate Diversification in the Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Hotspot

Edited by Leonora P. Costa and Yuri L. R. Leite

in Bones, Clones, and Biomes

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print June 2012 | ISBN: 9780226649191
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226649214 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226649214.003.0013
Historical Fragmentation Shaping Vertebrate Diversification in the Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Hotspot

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The Atlantic Forest is one of the world's 32 biodiversity hotspots, reflecting its high levels of plant and animal richness, endemism, and threats. Traditional biogeographic studies, based mainly on plants and other vertebrate groups, such as lizards, have long pointed out the singularities of this area, as well as provided indications of a marked distinction between north and south components in the Atlantic Forest. Phylogeographic studies have documented and reinforced the general pattern of southern and northern components for many taxonomic groups, including rodents, marsupials, carnivores, and xenarthrans, as well as for other vertebrates, such as lizards, birds, snakes, and frogs. There are striking phylogeographic breaks within the Atlantic Forest, most of them represented by northern and southern components that converge at 20°S latitude, suggesting a common vicariant event. However, it remains to be determined when and where the Atlantic Forest phylogroups were isolated, what events were responsible for their isolation, and how the different groups responded to such events.

Keywords: vertebrates; biodiversity; biogeography; phylogeographic; Atlantic Forest

Chapter.  9013 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biological Sciences

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