Chapter

“The Child Is an Animal”: Domesticity, Discipline, and the Logic of Joint Protection

in The Rights of the Defenseless

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print July 2011 | ISBN: 9780226652016
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226652023 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226652023.003.0002
“The Child Is an Animal”: Domesticity, Discipline, and the Logic of Joint Protection

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter examines why animal and child protection was combined in the U.S. during the Gilded Age. It explains that anticruelty reformers and humanitarians never felt they needed to justify their actions, but reformers usually averred that combining the two functions was a practical rather than an ideological matter. This chapter suggests that the desire to manage both children and animals through affection rather than violence reflected the changed attitudes about the inevitability of violence, pain and suffering in Gilded America.

Keywords: child protection; animal protection; U.S.; Gilded Age; anticruelty reformers; humanitarians; affection; violence; pain; suffering

Chapter.  14876 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of the Americas

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.