Chapter

Kant, Merleau-Ponty's Descriptive Phenomenology, and the Primacy of Perception

in Kant and Phenomenology

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print January 2011 | ISBN: 9780226723402
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226723419 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226723419.003.0007
Kant, Merleau-Ponty's Descriptive Phenomenology, and the Primacy of Perception

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This chapter, which examines Maurice Merleau-Ponty's ideas about descriptive phenomenology and the primacy of perception, explains the concept of Merleau-Ponty's descriptive conception of phenomenology and analyzes his views of perception, idealism, and Kantian idealism. It also contends that Merleau-Ponty's form of phenomenology was determined by an unusually wide range of influences that include French phenomenology, the Husserlian phenomenological tradition, and German idealism.

Keywords: Maurice Merleau-Ponty; descriptive phenomenology; primacy of perception; idealism; Kantian idealism; French phenomenology; Husserlian phenomenology; German idealism

Chapter.  8801 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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