Chapter

Conclusion On Overcoming the Epistemological Problem through Phenomenology

in Kant and Phenomenology

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print January 2011 | ISBN: 9780226723402
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226723419 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226723419.003.0008
Conclusion On Overcoming the Epistemological Problem through Phenomenology

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This chapter sums up the key findings of this study on the phenomenological approaches to epistemology. It argues against the claim that phenomenology originated in Edmund Husserl, who forged a link to epistemology that Martin Heidegger dissolved in his turn to ontology. The chapter contends that it was Immanuel Kant who worked out a phenomenological approach to epistemology, which was merely rethought by his main phenomenological successors, and also discusses the crucial problem in a constructivist form of epistemology.

Keywords: epistemology; phenomenology; Edmund Husserl; Martin Heidegger; ontology; Immanuel Kant; constructivist epistemology

Chapter.  2691 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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