Chapter

Lyric Autobiography: Intentional or Conventional Fallacy? <i>The Poetry of John Skelton (1460–1529) and Thomas Wyatt (1503–42)</i>

Meredith Anne Skura

in Tudor Autobiography

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print September 2008 | ISBN: 9780226761879
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226761886 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226761886.003.0002
Lyric Autobiography: Intentional or Conventional Fallacy? The Poetry of John Skelton (1460–1529) and Thomas Wyatt (1503–42)

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The poetry of John Skelton and Thomas Wyatt makes a good starting point for thinking about early English autobiography. Readers have been struck by each poet's apparently autobiographical speaker, who seems to be talking about his own experience rather than repeating the commonplaces found in other courtly verse. Both writers created personas whose fame lasted beyond the poet's life: Skelton, the rogue and jester; Wyatt, the ideal poet-courtier. This chapter examines the relation between convention and individuality in poems by Skelton and Wyatt. It then discusses each as an example of one of two roles for the writer in autobiography: the narrator (Wyatt) and the central figure in the narration (Skelton).

Keywords: early English autobiography; poets; rogue; jester; poet-courtier; narrator; narration; John Skelton; Thomas Wyatt

Chapter.  11280 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

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