Chapter

Identity in Autobiography and Protestant Identification with Saints: <i>John Bale and Paul in</i> The Vocacyon of Johan Bale (<i>1553</i>)

Meredith Anne Skura

in Tudor Autobiography

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print September 2008 | ISBN: 9780226761879
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226761886 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226761886.003.0003
Identity in Autobiography and Protestant Identification with Saints: John Bale and Paul in The Vocacyon of Johan Bale (1553)

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In the summer of 1552 rumors of King Edward VI's death reached Ireland and contributed to a long-simmering rebellion in the northern bishopric of Ossory. The recently appointed bishop, John Bale (1495–1563), scholar, playwright, and avid reformer, had been trying to move his reluctant flock closer toward the English Protestant norm. Not long after, when Queen Mary was proclaimed, Bale narrowly escaped an ambush in which several of his servants were killed. He managed to get to the Continent, refuge for exiles fleeing Mary's reign, and within a year he had published his account of the events, The Vocacyon of Johan Bale to the Bishopric of Ossorie in Irelande (1553). This chapter first sketches Bale's background, and then examines the discrepancies between Vocacyon and its theological models. It concludes by reading his text's internal discrepancies in the context of Bale's other autobiographical writings.

Keywords: John Bale; bishop; exiles; The Vocacyon of Johan Bale to the Bishopric of Ossorie in Irelande; autobiographical writings; English Protestant

Chapter.  9685 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

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