Chapter

Paternalism and the Social Control of Adolescent Girls: Juvenile Justice Reform in the United States

in Justice for Girls?

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print December 2009 | ISBN: 9780226770048
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226770062 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226770062.003.0003
Paternalism and the Social Control of Adolescent Girls: Juvenile Justice Reform in the United States

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More recently, there has been concern about the treatment of girls in the youth justice systems of both Canada and the United States. The differences between the treatment of girls and that of boys have been rarely discussed. Both the development of the juvenile courts and the justifications for a separate juvenile justice system have been oversimplified in many accounts. There were tensions from the beginning about the overall goals of the youth justice system and concerns about whether what was going on was really rehabilitation. In 1967, the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, appointed by President Lyndon Johnson, released a report documenting crime and delinquency in the United States. The report raised concerns about due process and advocated reserving court for serious offenses. In 1974, the U.S. Congress passed the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, the first piece of federal legislation directed at the youth justice system.

Keywords: youth justice systems; girls; boys; United States; juvenile courts; rehabilitation; due process; crime; delinquency; serious offenses

Chapter.  12213 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Criminal Law

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