Chapter

Monarch-Love; or, How the Prince of Wales Saved the Union

Elisa Tamarkin

in Anglophilia

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print July 2008 | ISBN: 9780226789446
Published online February 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226789439 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226789439.003.0001
Monarch-Love; or, How the Prince of Wales Saved the Union

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This chapter traces the democratic fascination with both the sacred rituals of state and the personalized authority of the British monarchy, while attempting to make sense of the symbolic value of such prepolitical attachments. It considers not only the comparative aesthetics of governmental power but also how such psychic projections onto the forms and practices of a monarchy elsewhere helped to address the political moment at home. In the decades leading up to the Civil War, Americans indulged in a cult of reverence toward Britain's monarchy not to express their loyalty to Queen Victoria but to experience a compensatory and archaic sense of attachment to the idea of a state unlike their own. Redefining allegiance as a felt response to dignity and grandeur (as embodied in a queen), Americans who loved Victoria found new ways to love America: they conceived of a different sort of patriotism than that enacted by the rational bonds of democratic ideology.

Keywords: state; British monarchy; government power; patriotism; Queen Victoria

Chapter.  35123 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Studies (19th Century)

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