Chapter

Something Old, Something New: Suburbanization in the Civil Rights Era, 1960–1980

in Places of Their Own

Published by University of Chicago Press

Published in print February 2004 | ISBN: 9780226896410
Published online March 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780226896267 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226896267.003.0009
Something Old, Something New: Suburbanization in the Civil Rights Era, 1960–1980

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African American suburbanization expanded during 1960 and 1970, pushed forward by gains in income and legal rights as well as the persistent efforts of black families to attain better places to live. The new suburbanites sought residential amenities and advantages on a par with those available to middle-class whites. Disinvestment through redlining and commercial flight, higher taxes, socioeconomic decline, and crime pursued even middle-class African American families to the suburbs. On average, black suburbanites received less for their money than suburban whites, and due to the age and service burden in many communities, paid higher taxes for the privilege. As a result, African Americans were much less able to convert class mobility into the same spatial benefits as their white counterparts.

Keywords: African American; suburbanization; suburbanites; disinvestment; suburban whites

Chapter.  17490 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of the Americas

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