Chapter

<i>Oscar and Lucinda</i> (1988)

Bruce Woodcock

in Peter Carey

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print November 2003 | ISBN: 9780719043604
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781700532 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719043604.003.0005
Oscar and Lucinda (1988)

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This chapter discusses Carey's most popular novel so far: Oscar and Lucinda. It states that the novel contains a self-conscious comedy and strangely magical quality that attracts readers almost immediately. It also reveals that this novel used historical narrative, which was a new element in Carey's repertoire. Oscar and Lucinda is also an anti-love story and stresses that relationships in Carey's fiction are generally full of gaps in understanding between people. This chapter also considers the theme of isolation within relationships that dominates the short period of the novel where Oscar and Lucinda are together.

Keywords: Oscar and Lucinda; self-conscious comedy; historical narrative; anti-love story; relationships; isolation

Chapter.  6381 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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