Chapter

<i>The Siege of Jerusalem</i> and recuperative readings

Elisa Narin van Court

in Pulp Fictions of Medieval England

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print July 2004 | ISBN: 9780719063183
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781700563 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719063183.003.0008
The Siege of Jerusalem and recuperative readings

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The fourteenth-century alliterative narrative The Siege of Jerusalemhas recently begun to generate the kind of interest associated with more canonical Middle English works. Scholarly studies have emerged to fill the lacunae of response and readings, and a new edition is forthcoming. This chapter argues that this new attention to Jerusalem is well deserved and long overdue, inhibited more by scholarly distaste for the poem's perceived relentless and violent anti-Judaism, than by any intrinsic lack of literary or cultural value. The argument concerning the poem is predicated on a recuperative reading in another sense of the word. It suggests that the virulent anti-Judaism from which scholars recoil is neither as unambiguous nor singular as is commonly claimed.

Keywords: alliterative narrative; Middle English; Siege of Jerusalem; anti-Judaism; recuperative reading

Chapter.  8727 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (Early and Medieval)

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