Chapter

Post-war films 1 – genre and British cinema

Tom Ryall

in Anthony Asquith

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780719064524
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781703007 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719064524.003.0017
Post-war films 1 – genre and British cinema

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter sheds light on the post-war British film industry and the turn Asquith's career took during these times. He was well established as one of the British cinema's leading directors on the basis of a diverse output: the middlebrow drama adaptations of Shaw and Rattigan, lowbrow genre films including a comedy thriller and a costume melodrama, patriotic war pictures and documentary dramas. Asquith resumed his directing career with While the Sun Shines (1947), and his next film, The Winslow Boy (1948), was a Rattigan adaptation in which he corraborated with Korda's revived London Films and British Lion. The Importance of Being Earnest, a version of Oscar Wilde's famous play from the 1890s, was his first film in colour. Asquith's genre exercises from the early 1950s, though containing much of interest – innovatory narrative structures, imaginative mise-enscène, lyricism, and poetry, the radical ideological questioning of war – remain little-known films on the periphery of the mainstream British cinema of the time.

Keywords: British film industry; middlebrow drama adaptations; lowbrow genre films; patriotic war pictures; documentary dramas

Chapter.  11340 words. 

Subjects: Film

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.