Chapter

The lie of the land

Frances Babbage

in Re-Visioning Myth

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print September 2011 | ISBN: 9780719067525
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781701782 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719067525.003.0002
The lie of the land

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An appreciation of mythology is perhaps central to Jungian psychoanalysis. Carl Jung claimed that beyond the individual unconscious, which was susceptible to ‘Freudian’ analysis, lay the collective unconscious: this contained patterns of psychic perception common to all humanity. Jung argued that the fantasy-images, or archetypes, found in dreams were not conscious and thus could not have been repressed. Feminist assessments of the virtue and feasibility of ‘mythic re-visionism’ as critical strategy have ranged from valorisation, to cautious or selective support, through to extreme scepticism or outright rejection. This chapter examines changing conceptions of myths and their importance. It discusses particular ways in which women have been preoccupied by myth narratives and considers the especial potential of theatre as medium for myth re-vision. The chapter includes a detailed analysis of one ‘proto-feminist’ drama from the early 1960s, the Dutch writer Hella Haasse's A Thread in the Dark.

Keywords: psychoanalysis; Carl Jung; myths; archetypes; mythic re-visionism; Hella Haasse; Thread in Dark; theatre

Chapter.  14989 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (Plays and Playwrights)

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