Chapter

United States policy on non-proliferation and the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty

Ian Bellany

in Curbing the Spread of Nuclear Weapons

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print February 2006 | ISBN: 9780719067969
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781701324 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719067969.003.0006
United States policy on non-proliferation and the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty

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The history of the attitude of the United States towards the spread of nuclear weapons has been one of continuous opposition, tempered now and then by the judgement of the government of the day as to whether in particular instances the exigencies of the moment outweighed the force of the general principle. The starting point or the rough first draft for the U.S. policy of hostility towards the spread of nuclear weapons is the Baruch Plan, presented in 1946 to the newly created United Nations Atomic Energy Commission by the U.S. representative on the Commission, Bernard M. Baruch. The Baruch Plan aimed to harmonise an anticipated widespread international interest in the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. President Dwight D. Eisenhower adopted a new anti-proliferation initiative at the end of 1953 in the form of Atoms for Peace. This chapter discusses U.S. policy on non-proliferation and the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, the Partial Test Ban Treaty, counter-proliferation and U.S. President George W. Bush's Proliferation Security Initiative.

Keywords: United States; nuclear weapons; Baruch Plan; Atoms for Peace; non-proliferation; Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty; Partial Test Ban Treaty; counter-proliferation; George W. Bush; Dwight D. Eisenhower

Chapter.  16255 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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