Chapter

‘A stranger borne / To be indenized with us, and made our owne’: Samuel Daniel and the naturalisation of Italian literary forms

Jason Lawrence

in Who the Devil Taught Thee So Much Italian?

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print August 2011 | ISBN: 9780719069147
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781702543 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719069147.003.0003
‘A stranger borne / To be indenized with us, and made our owne’: Samuel Daniel and the naturalisation of Italian literary forms

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This chapter explores how English poet Samuel Daniel consistently attempted to naturalise Italian poetic forms into English verse. It analyzes his works, from his earliest poetry in the Delia sonnets to the pastoral play Hymens Triumph in order to understand how his imitative methods developed. It suggests that it is possible to trace the composition and construction of his sonnet sequence Delia to two separate phases and each phase reflects the predominant use of sources from a specific sonnet tradition (French and then Italian).

Keywords: Samuel Daniel; Italian poetic forms; Delia; Hymens Triumph; imitative methods; sonnet tradition

Chapter.  22872 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

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