Chapter

Conclusion

Alison Forrestal

in Fathers, Pastors and Kings

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print October 2004 | ISBN: 9780719069765
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781700594 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719069765.003.0008
Conclusion

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This chapter sums up the key findings of this study on the history of episcopacy in France during the seventeenth century. The episcopate flourished, after its unsteady start to the Bourbon reign, because it was able to use the debate on episcopal jurisdiction to construct referential principles that stacked into a mature and conscious ideology of episcopal identity which defined its status and behaviour within church and society. Its adoption of a comprehensive ideology of episcopacy had its effect not just on bishops themselves, but also on the lower clergy, the papacy and the crown. For this reason, it can be said that the seventeenth century was a formative period not just for the character of the episcopate itself, but for that of the French church in general.

Keywords: episcopacy; France; episcopal jurisdiction; episcopal identity; papacy; clergy; French church

Chapter.  7223 words. 

Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)

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