Chapter

Divided duties: diasporic subjectivities and ‘race relations’ dramas (<i>Supply and Demand, The Bill, Second Generation</i>)

Geraldine Harris

in Beyond Representation

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print August 2011 | ISBN: 9780719074585
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781701010 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719074585.003.0013
Divided duties: diasporic subjectivities and ‘race relations’ dramas (Supply and Demand, The Bill, Second Generation)

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This chapter explores whether or not British television crime drama could be said to be ‘inherently racist’ on the level of form as well as representation. It begins with a discussion of the problematic concept of ‘race’ and explores the developments in thinking around issues of representation within anti-racist and postcolonial theory. It covers the rejection of realism as part of an attempt to get beyond simple positive or negative representations of subaltern groups, and the subsequent development of theories of cultural hybridity and diaspora aesthetics. While examining these latter concepts this chapter also explores their potential recuperation and depoliticisation as part of a more generalised and abstracted postmodern aesthetic. It concludes with a brief evaluation of some twenty-first-century British television dramas that might be said to show evidence of a diaspora aesthetic.

Keywords: race relations; Supply and Demand; The Bill; Second Generation; Jim Pines; Macpherson Report

Chapter.  12618 words. 

Subjects: Television

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