Chapter

Conclusion

John M. MacKenzie and Nigel R. Dalziel

in The Scots in South Africa

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780719076084
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781702741 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719076084.003.0009
Conclusion

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This chapter presents some concluding thoughts from the authors. Despite the relatively small number of Scots in South Africa, they were there in larger numbers than their proportion within the United Kingdom warranted. And their experience and their alleged capacities, as well as their ‘pushiness’, ensured that they always ‘punched above their weight’. Whether justified or not, they had a high reputation as people who could cope with the environment, as agriculturalists, as artisans in the construction industry and as engineers. Scots in SOuth Africa were highly influential in the Church; in education; in medical, scientific and environmental professions; as well as in the military, in business and in trade union activity.

Keywords: South Africa; British imperial period; Scots

Chapter.  4241 words. 

Subjects: Colonialism and Imperialism

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