Chapter

Conclusion

Lindsay Proudfoot and Dianne Hall

in Imperial Spaces

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print October 2011 | ISBN: 9780719078378
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781702895 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719078378.003.0009
Conclusion

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This chapter argues for increasing recognition of the diversity of the white presence during modern Australia's foundational narrative and for the complex place narratives created by subaltern settler groups as they imbued the landscape with their own sense of self. Place was central to Irish and Scottish diasporic experience. The ethnic diversity of the nineteenth-century British and Irish migration stream to Australia added hitherto under-regarded cultural complexity to the hegemonic white presence on that continent. The Irish migration stream contained various ethnic traditions claiming descent from different periods in the country's history in a complex mix of religion, culture, language and genetics. Churches of all denominations became places where diasporic identities were continuously redefined. Colonial settlement in Victoria and New South Wales was the outcome of individual and collective understanding and aspiration informed by memory and experience.

Keywords: diasporic experience; Australia; ethnic diversity; British migration; Irish migration; colonial settlement; Victoria; New South Wales

Chapter.  3432 words. 

Subjects: Colonialism and Imperialism

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