Chapter

The Catholic right, political Catholicism and radicalism

Ulrike Ehret

in Church, Nation and Race

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print December 2011 | ISBN: 9780719079436
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781702017 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719079436.003.0004
The Catholic right, political Catholicism and radicalism

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The Catholic right has been a stepchild of historical research into German conservatism and its relationship to National Socialism. The antisemitism of the Catholic right was certainly the most virulent form of Jew-hatred amongst Catholics in Weimar Germany. The German National People's Party (DNVP) would express its hope for an ‘unconditional denominational peace’ and stress the need for Germany's rebirth in a Christian spirit, and for a German culture and economy based on a ‘true Christian-religious worldview’. The antisemitism expressed across the network of the Catholic right was an amalgam of Christian, cultural and Darwinian anti-Jewish sentiments and reflects their Catholic faith and their discontent with the political and economic changes in Germany. The organisations of the Rechtskatholiken and Distributism worked with similar methods for the same aim: Christian national re-education. Negative images of Jews remained an unfailing part of the public discourse in both Catholic communities.

Keywords: Catholic right; political Catholicism; radicalism; National Socialism; German conservatism; Germany; antisemitism; Rechtskatholiken; Distributism

Chapter.  23483 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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