Chapter

John Hill and the Clyde unrest

Alastair J. Reid

in The Tide of Democracy

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print May 2010 | ISBN: 9780719081033
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781702949 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719081033.003.0010
John Hill and the Clyde unrest

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The government's war-time labour policy, far from falling under the influence of industrialists, remained in the hands of broadly progressive Liberals and under sustained pressure from assertive trade unionists. There could indeed be tactical disagreements among the latter in the heat of particular industrial disputes: however, even in the case of the less-well coordinated engineers there was no clear-cut polarisation between ‘rank and file’ and ‘bureaucracy’, but rather a dynamic interaction between local activists and national officials equally genuine in pursuit of their members' interests. Bearing in mind this clarification of some of the more general issues connected with war-time industrial relations, this chapter examines in more detail the interactions between leadership and democracy during the turbulent events in and around the shipyards of the Clyde.

Keywords: shipyards; shipbuilding; labour policy; labour relations; Liberals; trade unions; industrial relations; democracy

Chapter.  16602 words. 

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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