Chapter

Writing in the early Caroline regime and the issue of <i>Patriarcha</i>'s non-publication

Cesare Cuttica

in Sir Robert Filmer (1588-1653) and the Patriotic Monarch

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print December 2012 | ISBN: 9780719083747
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9781781704745 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719083747.003.0006
Writing in the early Caroline regime and the issue of Patriarcha's non-publication

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Chapter 5 focuses on the reign of Charles I (1600-1649), especially from the start of the so-called ‘Personal Rule’ (1629). It thus considers the King's policies, both at home and abroad; financial strategies; ideal of command; cultural taste. In particular, it examines their repercussions for thinkers who, like Filmer, were at work to carve out a successful image of the ruler and a forceful narrative of sovereignty. In addition, the chapter endeavours to establish how Patriarcha took part in the ideological enterprise of fortification of monarchical authority involving different types of cultural codification: political, pictorial, theological, literary. This approach involves references to models of royalty others than Charles’: Prince Henry (1594-1612) and Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden (1594-1632) feature as leading figures on a stage where the key issues were the defence of Protestantism as well as the promotion of English identity. In this context attention is then paid to Charles’ refusal to give permission to publish Patriarcha(1632). New questions are here raised: how compatible was Patriarcha with the Caroline narrative of kingship (e.g. with the writings of Roger Maynwaring and Robert Sibthorpe)? What significance did Filmer's theories have for Charles’ own vision of power?.

Keywords: Charles I; Caroline era; Kingship; Power; Protestantism; Patriarcha's failed publication; Filmer's originality

Chapter.  8928 words. 

Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)

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