Chapter

Conclusion: implications for war reporting, journalism studies and political phenomenology

Tim Markham

in The Politics of War Reporting

Published by Manchester University Press

Published in print November 2011 | ISBN: 9780719085284
Published online July 2012 | e-ISBN: 9781781702642 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9780719085284.003.0008
Conclusion: implications for war reporting, journalism studies and political phenomenology

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This chapter evaluates the relative merits of a Bourdieusian perspective on journalism and war reporting. It concentrates on the politics underlying the lived aspects of journalism that ‘just are’. It then turns to a reflexive appraisal of Bourdieusian political phenomenology. News values, ethics and journalistic dispositions do not emerge naturally out of the stuff of journalism, but they do have reason. Job insecurity can likewise be seen in terms of strategic positioning or distinction. The Bourdieusian approach to studying journalism clearly has its uses. Pierre Bourdieu is frequently categorised as adjacent to post-structuralist theory. A distinction needs to be drawn between a putative ideology, identity and culture of journalism. The interviews did not run to detailed life histories, but they did seek to establish why entering the journalistic field made sense to a respondent, why it seemed a logical or natural step to take.

Keywords: journalism; Bourdieusian political phenomenology; politics; Bourdieusian approach; Pierre Bourdieu; war reporting; job insecurity

Chapter.  12346 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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