Chapter

Protecting Human Rights Through International And National Law

Peter Weiss and Henry A. Freedman

in Social Injustice and Public Health

Published in print September 2005 | ISBN: 9780195171853
Published online September 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780199865352 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195171853.003.0027
Protecting Human Rights Through International And National Law

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This chapter discusses the protection of human rights through international and national law. It describes how international and national law can reduce social injustice and provides specific examples of how law has improved social justice. It provides an agenda for action, both internationally and in the United States. The chapter asserts that enforceable economic, social, and cultural rights represent the only sure bulwark against social injustice. It concludes that lawyers must go to court, victims of social injustice must “take to the streets,” and activists must lobby their elected representatives—these are the paths for fighting social injustice and achieving human rights.

Keywords: social injustice; human rights; international law; national law; advocacy; education; litigation

Chapter.  5408 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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