Journal Article

Ethylene Production by Fe-deficient Roots and its Involvement in the Regulation of Fe-deficiency Stress Responses by Strategy I Plants

FRANCISCO J. ROMERA, ESTEBAN ALCANTARA and MANUEL D. DE LA GUARDIA

in Annals of Botany

Published on behalf of The Annals of Botany Company

Volume 83, issue 1, pages 51-55
Published in print January 1999 | ISSN: 0305-7364
Published online January 1999 | e-ISSN: 1095-8290 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1006/anbo.1998.0793
Ethylene Production by Fe-deficient Roots and its Involvement in the Regulation of Fe-deficiency Stress Responses by Strategy I Plants

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Species that showed marked morphological and physiological responses by their roots to Fe-deficiency (Strategy I plants) were compared with others that do not exhibit these responses (Strategy II plants). Roots from Fe-deficient cucumber (Cucumis sativusL. ‘Ashley’), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentumMill. T3238FER) and pea (Pisum sativumL. ‘Sparkle’) plants produced more ethylene than those of Fe-sufficient plants. The higher production of ethylene in Fe-deficient cucumber and pea plants occurred before Fe-deficient plants showed chlorosis symptoms and was parallel to the occurrence of Fe-deficiency stress responses. The addition of either the ethylene precursor ACC, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, or the ethylene releasing substance, Ethephon, to several Fe-sufficient Strategy I plants [cucumber, tomato, pea, sugar beet (Beta vulgarisL.),Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana(L.) Heynh ‘Columbia’), plantago (Plantago lanceolataL.)] promoted some of their Fe-deficiency stress responses: enhanced root ferric-reducing capacity and swollen root tips. By contrast, Fe-deficient roots from several Strategy II plants [maize (Zea maysL. ‘Funo’), wheat (Triticum aestivumL. ‘Yécora’), barley (Hordeum vulgareL. ‘Barbarrosa’)] did not produce more ethylene than the Fe-sufficient ones. Furthermore, ACC had no effect on the reducing capacity of these Strategy II plants and, except in barley, did not promote swelling of root tips. In conclusion, results suggest that ethylene is involved in the regulation of Fe-deficiency stress responses by Strategy I plants.Copyright 1999 Annals of Botany Company.

Keywords: Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana(L.) Heynch), barley (Hordeum vulgareL.), cucumber (Cucumis sativusL.), ethylene, iron deficiency, maize (Zea maysL.), pea (Pisum sativumL.), plantago (Plantago lanceolataL.), ferric-reducing capacity, sugar beet (Beta vulgarisL.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentumMill.), wheat (Triticum aestivumL.).

Journal Article.  7 words. 

Subjects: Ecology and Conservation ; Evolutionary Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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