Chapter

Community Law Clinics: Teaching Students, Working with Disadvantaged Communities

ANNA CODY AND BARBARA SCHATZ

in The Global Clinical Movement

Published in print November 2010 | ISBN: 9780195381146
Published online January 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199869305 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195381146.003.0011
Community Law Clinics: Teaching Students, Working with Disadvantaged Communities

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This chapter describes two different community law clinics and their approaches to clinical legal education, one in the United States and one in Australia. Though only two models of many, they illustrate both the common features of community law clinics around the world and some of the choices and trade-offs they confront in their efforts to help disadvantaged communities. Common features include taking a holistic, interdisciplinary approach to the problems of communities and community organizations, emphasizing the client role in setting the agenda and solving problems, using community legal education to build client capacity, engaging in law reform to address systemic issues, and encouraging critical thinking about the ways law can be used to further social justice. A major challenge is the tension between solving concrete, immediate problems and addressing broader concerns and systemic inequalities.

Keywords: clinical legal education; law clinic; community; community organizations; capacity; problem solving; community legal education; law reform; social justice; interdisciplinary approach

Chapter.  7453 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

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