Chapter

Rock ‘n’ Film Crisis

David E. James

in Rock 'N' Film

Published in print February 2016 | ISBN: 9780199387595
Published online December 2015 | e-ISBN: 9780199387632 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199387595.003.0015
Rock ‘n’ Film Crisis

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  • Literary Theory and Cultural Studies
  • Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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The Stone’s US tours in 1969 and 1972 confronted the anarchic social and political forces unleashed by the counterculture. In the first, Gimme Shelter (1970), Charlotte Zwerin edited Albert and David Maysles’s footage of the 1969 tour to make a parable of the Stones’ culpability: the film focused on the tragic free concert where the Hells Angels killed a black man. The next tour produced two documentaries. The first, Robert Frank’s Cocksucker Blues (1972), gave full expression to the drug taking, sexual promiscuity, and privilege of the Stones’ entourage that insulated them from any contact with their fans. The second, Ladies and Gentlemen the Rolling Stones (Rollin Binzer, 1974) contained only the spectacle of performance. It thus supplanted the “concert film,” which had joined the musicians with the fans in the same commonality, with the purely financial undertakings that would replace them: the filmed concert.

Keywords: Rolling Stones; Gimme Shelter; Charlotte Zwerin; Hells Angels; Robert Frank; Cocksucker Blues; Ladies and Gentlemen the Rolling Stones; Rollin Binzer; filmed concert

Chapter.  11627 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies ; Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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