Article

Diplomacy and War

Robert Weiner and Paul Sharp

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of International Studies

Published in print March 2010 |
Published online December 2017 | e-ISBN: 9780190846626 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190846626.013.156

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Scholars acknowledge that there is a close connection between diplomacy and war, but they disagree with regard to the character of this connection—what it is and what it ought to be. In general, diplomacy and war are assumed to be antagonistic and polar opposites. In contrast, the present diplomatic system is founded on the view that state interests may be pursued, international order maintained, and changes effected in it by both diplomacy and war as two faces of a single statecraft. To understand the relationships between diplomacy and war, we must look at the development of the contemporary state system and the evolution of warfare and diplomacy within it. In this context, one important claim is that the foundations of international organizations in general, and the League of Nations in particular, rest on a critique of modern (or “old”) diplomacy. For much of the Cold War, the intellectual currents favored the idea of avoiding nuclear war to gain advantage. In the post-Cold War era, the relationship between diplomacy and war remained essentially the same, with concepts such as “humanitarian intervention” and “military diplomacy” capturing the idea of a new international order. The shocks to the international system caused by events between the terrorist attacks on the United States in 2001 and the invasion of Iraq in 2003 have intensified the paradoxes of the relationship between diplomacy and war.

Keywords: diplomacy; war; international order; statecraft; international organizations; League of Nations; Cold War; nuclear war; humanitarian intervention; military diplomacy

Article.  3423 words. 

Subjects: Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution ; Diplomacy and Consular Relations

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