Article

The Woman Suffrage Movement in the United States

Rebecca J. Mead

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History


Published online March 2018 | e-ISBN: 9780199329175 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780199329175.013.17

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Legal and Constitutional History
  • Political History
  • US Cultural History
  • American Women's History

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Woman suffragists in the United States engaged in a sustained, difficult, and multigenerational struggle: seventy-two years elapsed between the Seneca Falls convention (1848) and the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment (1920). During these years, activists gained confidence, developed skills, mobilized resources, learned to maneuver through the political process, and built a social movement. This essay describes key turning points and addresses internal tensions as well as external obstacles in the U.S. woman suffrage movement. It identifies important strategic, tactical, and rhetorical approaches that supported women’s claims for the vote and influenced public opinion, and shows how the movement was deeply connected to contemporaneous social, economic, and political contexts.

Keywords: woman suffrage; voting rights; women’s rights; feminism; women’s movements; constitutional amendments

Article.  11570 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Legal and Constitutional History ; Political History ; US Cultural History ; American Women's History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.