Article

Okinawan Language

Shinsho Miyara

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Linguistics


Published online June 2018 | e-ISBN: 9780199384655 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780199384655.013.301

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  • Grammar, Syntax and Morphology
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Within the Ryukyuan branch of the Japonic family of languages, present-day Okinawan retains numerous regional variants which have evolved for over a thousand years in the Ryukyuan Archipelago. Okinawan is one of the six Ryukyuan languages that UNESCO identified as endangered. One of the theoretically fascinating features is that there is substantial evidence for establishing a high central phonemic vowel in Okinawan although there is currently no overt surface [ï]. Moreover, the word-initial glottal stop [ʔ] in Okinawan is more salient than that in Japanese when followed by vowels, enabling recognition that all Okinawan words are consonant-initial. Except for a few particles, all Okinawan words are composed of two or more morae. Suffixation or vowel lengthening (on nouns, verbs, and adjectives) provides the means for signifying persons as well as things related to human consumption or production. Every finite verb in Okinawan terminates with a mood element. Okinawan exhibits a complex interplay of mood or negative elements and focusing particles. Evidentiality is also realized as an obligatory verbal suffix.

Keywords: Okinawan; Ryukyuan languages; glottal stop [ʔ]; high central phonemic vowel; palatalization; vowel lengthening; vowel coalescence; moods; focusing; evidentiality

Article.  10152 words. 

Subjects: Language Families ; Grammar, Syntax and Morphology ; Phonetics and Phonology

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