Chapter

Institutions

in Islamic History

Published in print January 2010 | ISBN: 9780199545728
Published online September 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191777264 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780199545728.003.0003

Series: Very Short Introductions

Institutions

Show Summary Details

Preview

‘Institutions’ examines three institutions — the mosque, jihad, and the caliphate ℄ that have been common to all Muslim societies, while being different in practice in the various regions and periods of Islamic history. The building of a mosque, a place of worship, was a way of asserting Islam's victory over other religions, but Islam and its monuments were defined in direct relation to those of local religious traditions. The definition of jihad has long been contentious. Islamists believe that jihad must be waged by the community as a whole, to expand the borders of an Islamic state — a caliphate — led by a ‘caliph’.

Keywords: Aga Khan; Osama Bin Laden; Dome of the Rock; Islam; jihad; Elijah Muhammad; Muslim; Nadir Shah; Nation of Islam; Ottoman Empire

Chapter.  4590 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Islam ; Middle Eastern History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.