Journal Article

THE ROYAL AFRICAN SOCIETY, AFRICAN AFFAIRS AND APARTHEID: THE MUSTOE CONTROVERSY OF 1970

Chris Youé

in African Affairs

Published on behalf of Royal African Society

Published in print January 2014 | ISSN: 0001-9909
Published online April 2014 | e-ISSN: 1468-2621 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/afraf/adu025
THE ROYAL AFRICAN SOCIETY, AFRICAN AFFAIRS AND APARTHEID: THE MUSTOE CONTROVERSY OF 1970

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Divisions between the Royal African Society and its flagship journal African Affairs emerged in 1970 when the Vice-President of the Society, Nelson Mustoe Q.C., defended South African apartheid as ‘moral, feasible and reasonable.’ This statement, part of a letter to The Times, was offered in support of the upcoming Springbok cricket tour of Britain. The letter elicited a backlash from various groups, including the scholars behind African Affairs, and the political pressure led to the cancellation of the tour. This paper argues that the Mustoe controversy was an emblematic moment, symbolizing the transition of British Empire and commonwealth, the beginning of the political activism phase of the anti-apartheid movement in Britain, and South Africa's isolation on the world stage.

Journal Article.  5289 words. 

Subjects: African Studies ; International Relations ; African History ; Regional Political Studies

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