Reference Entry

Gillot, Claude

in Benezit Dictionary of Artists

ISBN: 9780199773787
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199899913 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/benz/9780199773787.article.B00073986
Gillot, Claude

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French, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 27 April 1673, in Langres; died 4 May 1722, in Paris.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver. Religious subjects, mythological subjects, portraits, genre scenes, interiors with figures.

It is believed that after receiving instruction in the fundamentals from his father, André Jacques Gillot, Claude Gillot came to Paris while very young, and studied with J.B. Corneille. At 30, his reputation as a decorative and arabesque painter was firmly established. He supplied the Grand Opéra with decors and costumes. It was at this time that a young Dutch artist named Spœde introduced him to Watteau. From this first meeting emerged a friendship and collaboration that was to last for five years. Gillot seemingly had a taste for friendship and pleasure. Watteau became both his dinner companion and his pupil. It is said that it is from Gillot that Watteau took the idea of the Fêtes Galantes (Gallant Feasts). In 1708, the two friends went their separate ways, and the exact reason for the break is unknown, although according to Gersaint, their separation was "as much to their mutual satisfaction as had been their friendship". It was argued that after the separation, Gillot stopped painting in order to devote himself exclusively to his drawings and etchings. This assertion was subsequently disproved, since Gillot was accepted into the academy on 27 April 1715 with ...

Reference Entry.  1517 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Painting ; Prints and Printmaking ; Religious Art ; Christian Art ; 18th-Century Art

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