Journal Article

I Am My Brother’s Keeper: Communitarian Obligations to the Dying Person

Jason T Eberl

in Christian bioethics: Non-Ecumenical Studies in Medical Morality

Volume 24, issue 1, pages 38-58
Published in print March 2018 | ISSN: 1380-3603
Published online March 2018 | e-ISSN: 1744-4195 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cb/cbx016
I Am My Brother’s Keeper: Communitarian Obligations to the Dying Person

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Philosophy
  • Christian Life and Practice
  • Medical Ethics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Abstract

Contemporary arguments concerning the permissibility of physician-assisted suicide [PAS], or suicide in general, often rehearse classical arguments over whether individual persons have a fundamental right based on autonomy to determine their own death, or whether the community has a legitimate interest in individual members’ welfare that would prohibit suicide. I explicate historical arguments pertaining to PAS aligned with these poles. I contend that an ethical indictment of PAS entails moral duties on the part of one’s community to provide effective means of ameliorating physical and existential suffering. I further elucidate how such duties have been affirmed by the Roman Catholic Church. My aim is to provide reasons why the expanding legalization of PAS should not preclude social investment in effective palliative care and the provision of a communal presence to the dying as they confront their subjectively experienced suffering.

Keywords: communitarianism; physician-assisted suicide; Roman Catholic Church; suffering; Thomas Aquinas

Journal Article.  9741 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; Christian Life and Practice ; Medical Ethics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.