Journal Article

Academic and Social Benefits of a Co-enrollment Model of Inclusive Education for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

Kathryn H. Kreimeyer, Pamela Crooke, Cynthia Drye, Vivian Egbert and Barbara Klein

in The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

Volume 5, issue 2, pages 174-185
Published in print April 2000 | ISSN: 1081-4159
Published online April 2000 | e-ISSN: 1465-7325 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/deafed/5.2.174
Academic and Social Benefits of a Co-enrollment Model of Inclusive
 Education for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

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Deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/hh) students are traditionally educated within self-contained programs at residential or special day schools, within self-contained or resource classrooms in public schools, or within regular education classrooms with support provided by an itinerant teacher. The co-enrollment model offers a promising alternative in which these students are educated within a regular education classroom composed of both d/hh and hearing students and team-taught by a teacher of the deaf and a regular education teacher. This article examines the development of one such program and the social and academic performance of the d/hh students within the program. Data on social interaction between d/hh and hearing classmates suggest that specific instructional strategies that promoted students' sign language development, identified d/hh students as “sign language specialists” and grouped d/hh and hearing students during academic activities resulted in increased interaction between these two groups of students. Stanford Achievement Test scores in the areas of reading vocabulary, reading comprehension, mathematical problem solving and procedures indicate that although d/hh students scored below the national normative hearing group, reading comprehension levels exceeded the national normative sample of d/hh students during both years two and three of the program. We discuss the challenges of implementing a co-enrollment program.

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Subjects: Education ; Linguistics ; Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

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