Journal Article

Psychometric properties of the consumer quality index to assess shelter and community care services

Mariëlle D. Beijersbergen, Jolanda K. Asmoredjo, Milou G.M. Christians and Judith R.L.M. Wolf

in European Journal of Public Health

Published on behalf of European Journal of Public Health

Volume 25, issue 3, pages 378-384
Published in print June 2015 | ISSN: 1101-1262
Published online December 2014 | e-ISSN: 1464-360X | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cku195
Psychometric properties of the consumer quality index to assess shelter and community care services

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Economics of Health
  • Health, Illness, and Medicine

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Background: Our aim was to design a valid and reliable consumer quality index (CQI) specifically suited to assess the experiences that homeless people, homeless youth, and abused women have with shelter and community care services. Methods: A pilot CQI questionnaire was constructed on the basis of literature study, focus group discussions with clients, concept mapping by clients and shelter workers, and a pre-pilot study. The pilot questionnaire was completed by 762 clients using shelter facilities for homeless people, homeless youth or abused women. Psychometric and multilevel analyses were performed to optimize the instrument and determine its validity, reliability and discriminative power. Results: The preparatory research had revealed seven primary focus topics, all of which were incorporated into the pilot questionnaire. Psychometric analyses resulted in four reliable scales, one of which applied only to clients in residential, day or night shelter programs. The final instrument consisted of 42 items for community care clients and 52 for clients using residential facilities, and day and night shelters; 32 and 42 such items pertained to client experiences. Conclusion: The consumer quality index for shelter and community care services (CQI-SCCS) is a valid, reliable instrument for assessing the quality of these services. It provides guidance to facilities in quality maintenance and improvement, and it is useful in determining quality differences in facilities for homeless people and homeless youth.

Journal Article.  4865 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology ; Economics of Health ; Health, Illness, and Medicine

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or purchase to access all content.